Welcome to Episode 63

ProMedNetwork.comThe Nursing Show is a proud member of the ProMed Podcast Network.

Listen to the show!

podcastdownload.jpg Right Click to download (Macs Option Click)

itunesnew.jpg Subscribe with iTunes here (must have iTunes installed — it’s free)

RSS Feed to subscribe (copy url to Juice, Zune Marketplace, or your favorite podcatcher)

Click the arrow to play the Nursing Show

[audio:http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/media.blubrry.com/nursing_show/podcast-archives.s3.amazonaws.com/nursingshow/NursingShow_20090116.mp3]

A podcast for Nurses, Nursing Students, and others interested in what it takes to be a Nurse

Fill out our Survey.

—————————-

Sponsors

Try GotoMyPC free for 30 days! For this special offer, visit www.gotomypc.com/podcast

GoDaddy.com for all your internet needs. Domain names, hosting, blogging and more.

  • Use the promo codes BLU27 or POD27 to get 10% off your orders

———————————–

News–

Use of simple OR checklist reduces surgery complications

Texas bills designed to improve nursing shortage

Incentives to nurse

———————————–

Tip of the Week– Vital Signs Review

How many nurses and nursing students look at vital signs in a key part of the patient assessment process. I’m often told by others a single set of “normal” vital signs (pulse, respiration, blood pressure, temp) and then I’m told the patient is stable. How do you know by just these vital signs?

A single set of vital signs does not a stable patient make!

This week is a look at the basic vital signs including some assessment tips and guidelines. The review will cover the “Big 3 Vital signs” – Pulse, Respiration, and Blood Pressure. These are the big three because sometimes, that’s all many think of as vital signs. In the next episode in this series, I’ll address some of the fallacies associated with that line of thought and explain how to make the total picture of patient presentation your focus.

Followed by the big 3, I’ll be looking at the final three in the vital signs six part process. Beyond pulse, respiration, and blood pressure patients should also be regularly assessed for temperature, pulse ox, and pain. Of these, pulse ox is the most overused and misunderstood, while pain is the most important for patient care and yet the least used. We’ll examine that paradox in a future episode here as well.

Normal vital signs values can be found at the links below as well as some other excellent student resources at our forum partner AllNurses.com. If you are looking for an answer in the realm of nursing, you will find it from the hundreds of thousands of visitors and members at AllNurses.com.

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Vital signs

A Practical Guide to Clinical Medicine

University of Manitoba Student Nurse Lab

Vital Signs from AllNurses.com Forums

———————————-

Stay informed as a nurse:

Subscribe to American Journal of Nursing via Amazon.com here

———————————–

Don’t miss an episode! Get the Nursing Show Newsletter by email.

Comment or share ideas here on the comment link below or by email:

Comments@NursingShow.com

Other Podcasts from Jamie Davis:

Contact Me!

——————————–

Song this week:

“Forever” by In This Moment

In This Moment - The Dream - Forever
————————————-

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Tagged with →  
Share →

2 Responses to Nursing Vital Signs Review and Episode 63

  1. […] « Nursing Vital Signs Review and Episode 63 […]

  2. […] Know more about Vital Signs in this episode of the Nursing Show podcast […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *