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News–

ANA Complains About Nurse Jackie TV Show

Nurse Jackie Page at Showtime

Cardiac Patients at Greater Risk in Crowded ER’s

FDA Approves Some Newer Antipsychotic Meds for Kids

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Tip of the Week– Antipsychotic Medication Review

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) on Antipsychotic Meds

Article on Understanding Behavioral Issues Caused by Antipsychotics

Adherence Behaviour for Antipsychotic Medications

Info about Antipsychotic Medications for Nurses and Patients

(from the NIMH web site)

Antipsychotic medications are used to treat schizophrenia and schizophrenia-related disorders. Some of these medications have been available since the mid-1950’s. They are also called conventional “typical” antipsychotics. Some of the more commonly used medications include:

  • Chlorpromazine (Thorazine)
  • Haloperidol (Haldol)
  • Perphenazine (generic only)
  • Fluphenazine (generic only)

In the 1990’s, new antipsychotic medications were developed. These new medications are called second generation, or “atypical” antipsychotics.

One of these medications was clozapine (Clozaril). It is a very effective medication that treats psychotic symptoms, hallucinations, and breaks with reality, such as when a person believes he or she is the president. But clozapine can sometimes cause a serious problem called agranulocytosis, which is a loss of the white blood cells that help a person fight infection. Therefore, people who take clozapine must get their white blood cell counts checked every week or two. This problem and the cost of blood tests make treatment with clozapine difficult for many people. Still, clozapine is potentially helpful for people who do not respond to other antipsychotic medications.

Other atypical antipsychotics were developed. All of them are effective, and none cause agranulocytosis.

These include:

  • Risperidone (Risperdal)
  • Olanzapine (Zyprexa)
  • Quetiapine (Seroquel)
  • Ziprasidone (Geodon)
  • Aripiprazole (Abilify)
  • Paliperidone (Invega)

Side effects of many antipsychotics include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness when changing positions
  • Blurred vision
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Sensitivity to the sun
  • Skin rashes
  • Menstrual problems for women.

Atypical antipsychotic medications can cause major weight gain and changes in a person’s metabolism. This may increase a person’s risk of getting diabetes and high cholesterol.1 A person’s weight, glucose levels, and lipid levels should be monitored regularly by a doctor while taking an atypical antipsychotic medication.

Typical antipsychotic medications can cause side effects related to physical movement, such as:

  • Rigidity
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • Tremors
  • Restlessness.

Long-term use of typical antipsychotic medications may lead to a condition called tardive dyskinesia (TD). TD causes muscle movements a person can’t control. The movements commonly happen around the mouth. TD can range from mild to severe, and in some people the problem cannot be cured. Sometimes people with TD recover partially or fully after they stop taking the medication.

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Other Podcasts from Jamie Davis:

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Song this week:

Podsafe music from the PMNJim’s Big Ego with — “Stress” at iTunes

Jim's Big Ego - noplace Like Nowhere - Stress

Click here to check out other Songs from the MedicCast Network Podcasts at the iTunes Store.

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